Fishing With Gorillas!

JFK Kwitonda LR Export-9

Image Credit / GorillaDoctorsBlog.org

Gorilla culture and tool use is currently shrouded in relative mystery when compared to our understanding of other great apes.  For example, landmark behavioural studies detailing technological variation and distribution have been published for all great apes except gorillas (e.g., bonobos, chimpanzees, orangutans).

In the major gorilla tool use study I am aware of, gorillas were observed engaging in behaviours that can only reasonably be asserted to be technologically complex.  In one situation a gorilla was observed using a stick as a walking stick to aid in balance when crossing a river.  In another situation a gorilla was observed using shrubs to construct a bridge to cross a river.  Both of these observations demonstrate that gorillas have a very complex understanding of how physical systems work.  Furthermore, it is evidence that gorillas have a well-developed understanding of physical systems that extends beyond the acquisition of food.

In most situations throughout the animal kingdom, tool use is stimulated by an inaccessible and valuable nutritional resource.  This is true for New Caledonian crows, bearded capuchin monkeys, bottlenose dolphins, and most other tool using species.  Tool use that is directed towards non-food related goals is theorized to develop later.  So considering that gorillas have already been observed using tools for non-food related goals, it logically follows that they should have a tool kit that involves tools for procuring food.

Gorilla Doctors Blog is reporting that just such an observation has now been made.  The observation was made by Jean Felix, a medical doctor who was making a routine health check on a population of gorillas in Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda.

He reported that a second ranked silverback gorilla was:

eating ants by reaching his left hand into the ant pile before putting it in his mouth. He ran away at one point – it appeared the ants were biting his arm. Afterwards, juvenile female Lisanga joined him and used a piece of wood to retract the ants from their nest.

This is an interesting observation.  It seems as though a high ranking male was unaware that access to an ant food resource required a tool in order to prevent being attacked.  Considering that this was not an official primatological study, no further data is available that I’m aware of, but the observation raises several questions:

  • Was the juvenile female teaching the silverback?
  • Why was a younger individual aware of a tool that the older individual seemed unaware of?
  • Are female gorillas more adept tool users than males?

I don’t think any primatologists have the answers to these questions at present.  But, as I stated a few months ago, I am really excited to see what future research reveals about gorilla culture and tool use.

What do you think of this observation?  Let Cadell know on Twitter!

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About Cadell Last
Hello. I'm probably drinking coffee and reading.

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